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Sermons and Episcopal charges Henry Ustick Onderdonk

Sermons and Episcopal charges

Henry Ustick Onderdonk

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General Books publication date: 2009 Original publication date: 1851 Original Publisher: Printed for the author, C. Sherman, printer Subjects: Sermons, American Religion / Christianity / Anglican Religion / Christianity / Episcopalian Religion /MoreGeneral Books publication date: 2009 Original publication date: 1851 Original Publisher: Printed for the author, C. Sherman, printer Subjects: Sermons, American Religion / Christianity / Anglican Religion / Christianity / Episcopalian Religion / Sermons / Christian Religion / Christian Ministry / Preaching Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of the original. It has no illustrations and there may be typos or missing text. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. Excerpt: SERMON XLV. LENT. SANCTIFIED SUBMISSION. Patient in tribulation. -- Romans zii. 12. What tribulation is, my brethren, we all know, -- and know but too well, -- for it is the universal heritage of mortals, -- and largely, with most, is it inflicted throughout their course. We need therefore no definition of this feature in our earthly lot. Yet the word furnishes touching illustrations of the thing. In the original Greek, the word comes from one signifying -- to crowd or press against, and so to straiten closely: such affliction being like the almost suffocation, and the helplessness, of a person in the midst of a densely thronged multitude, -- where there is no escape from the suffering which makes breathing itself a burden. In the Latin, from which our word tribulation comes, the illustration is yet more forcible. In ancient times, when grain was to be threshed out, the sheaves were laid on the threshing-floor, and over these was drawn a small cart or dray, or a sort of sled with rollers underneath, (and sometimes there were also teeth, as in Isa. xli. 15,) -- which instrument, in its repeated and varied motion, was kept bruising the sheaves, till the grain was fully separated from the straw, and ready to be winnowed, and treasured up in the garner. This instrument was a tribula- -- and the harsh, tearing process may be translated tribulating: the distr...