Home » An aquaponic system: Component comparisons and applications . by Nathaniel Robert. Storey
An aquaponic system: Component comparisons and applications . Nathaniel Robert. Storey

An aquaponic system: Component comparisons and applications .

Nathaniel Robert. Storey

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ISBN : 9781109532821
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169 pages
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 About the Book 

Waste-loop closure is rapidly becoming a major goal of agricultural and industrial development, for reducing waste products, diversifying economic bases, and increasing sustainability. This study examines waste loop closure within the context of anMoreWaste-loop closure is rapidly becoming a major goal of agricultural and industrial development, for reducing waste products, diversifying economic bases, and increasing sustainability. This study examines waste loop closure within the context of an aquaponic system (integrated hydroponic plant production and aquaculture). Alone, both aquaculture and hydroponic plant production encounter serious waste-based inefficiencies and costs, but by combining them, waste products from one system can be cycled through the other, conserving nutrients and water. This system was designed to examine this concept with international development goals as well as domestic agricultural applications in mind. Three hydroponic production techniques were tested against each other: a nutrient film technique (NFT) component, a gravel bed component (GBT), and a vertical aeroponic component (VAT). The nutrient solution used was aquacultural effluent from a Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)/Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) polyculture. Butterhead lettuce ( Lactuca sativa var. Patrick) was cultured using these plant production techniques with aquacultural effluent as the nutrient source. When plant deaths were low all techniques performed similarly, while when plant deaths were high, the NFT component performed best. Carp and tilapia production was poor due to fish stress.